RESEARCH

Exploring human interaction with the natural world

My areas of research are interdisciplinary. I am interested in unlocking how humans and nature interact with each other, to understand their applications in conservation. My projects span a wide range of topics- from understanding the ecological effects of artificial reefs to perception studies for the design of citizen science modules.

For more information, drop me an email

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TO BE OR NOT TO BE? TESTING THE VIABILITY OF ARTIFICIAL REEF SYSTEMS AT PALK BAY, INDIA. 

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ECOLOGICAL MONITORING OF ARTIFICIAL REEF ECOSYSTEMS IN PONDICHERRY, INDIA 

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UNDERSTANDING SCUBA DIVER PERCEPTIONS OF CORAL REEF HEALTH - A CASE STUDY FROM TIOMAN ISLAND, MALAYSIA 

June 2019 - Ongoing

Nestled in the Southern state of Tamil Nadu, the Palk Bay is one of the most over-fished regions of India. Coral reefs have been left decimated by trawlers. This project looks into the viability of marine restoration through artificial reefs. I run this project in collaboration with Quest Academy. 

This project is funded by QTT Adventure Sports Private Limited. 

Photo by Rishab Menon 

September 2018 - April 2020

In regions affected by habitat fragmentation  and biodiversity loss, artificial reefs can function as a mitigation method to restore local biodiversity. This project explores the biodiversity and species assemblage established at a 5 year old reef ecosystem in Pondicherry.

This project is funded by the Ravi Sankaran Small Grants Program, facilitated by the Inlaks Shivdasani Foundation. 

Photo by Pavel Nalini Natrajan

May - August 2017

Across the world, tourism provides a key source of income in Marine Protected Areas. With SCUBA diving becoming increasingly popular, recreational divers can choose to contribute to ecosystem monitoring and conservation by participating in citizen science. The study explored the potential of perception surveys of scuba divers as a tool for citizen science. 

This project was funded by Universiti Malaysia Terengganu. 

Photo by Jonathan Goldenberg